Course Content
Alternating Current (AC)
Advantages of (AC) - AC Waveforms - Sine Wave Values - Resistive Loads - Power in an AC Circuit - Skin Affects in AC circuits
0/5
Basic Trigonometry and Vectors
- Right Triangles - The Pythagorean Theorem - Sines - Cosigns - Tangents - Formulas - Practical Application
Inductance in AC Circuits
Inductance - Inductive Reactance - Schematic Symbols - Inductors Connected In Series - Inductors Connected In Parallel Circuits - Voltage & Current Relationships in an Inductive Circuit - Power in an Inductive Circuit - Reactive power - Q of an Inductor
Resistive-Inductive Series Circuits
R-L Series Circuits - Impedance - Total Current - Total Current - Voltage Drop across the Resistor - Watts - Computing the Inductance - Total Voltage - Computing the Reactive Power- Computing the Apparent Power - Power Factor - Angle Theta
Resistive-Inductive Parallel Circuits
Resistive-Inductance Parallel Circuits - Computing Circuit Values
Electrical Theory – Alternating Current (AC), Basic Trigonometry and Resistance
About Lesson

Learning Objectives:

  • Understand how to calculate the frequency of an AC waveform
  • Understand how to calculate the voltage of an AC waveform
  • Understand the importance of these calculations in AC circuit analysis

Introduction: Alternating Current (AC) is a type of electrical current that reverses direction at regular intervals. AC circuits are used in many applications, from home appliances to industrial machinery. Understanding how to calculate the frequency and voltage of an AC waveform is essential for designing and analyzing AC circuits.

Calculation of AC Frequency: The frequency of an AC waveform is the number of complete cycles that the waveform completes in one second. The formula for calculating frequency is:

Frequency = 1 / Time period

The time period is the time it takes for one complete cycle of the waveform to occur. The time period can be calculated as follows:

Time period = 1 / Frequency

For example, if the time period of an AC waveform is 0.01 seconds, then the frequency can be calculated as follows:

Frequency = 1 / 0.01 = 100 Hz

Calculation of AC Voltage: The voltage of an AC waveform varies over time. The peak voltage is the maximum voltage of the waveform, while the root mean square (RMS) voltage is the equivalent DC voltage that would produce the same amount of power as the AC voltage. The formulas for calculating peak voltage and RMS voltage are:

Peak Voltage = (Amplitude) x (sqrt(2)) RMS Voltage = (Amplitude) / (sqrt(2))

The amplitude of an AC waveform is the maximum value of the waveform from the center or zero point. For example, if the amplitude of an AC waveform is 10 volts, then the peak voltage and RMS voltage can be calculated as follows:

Peak Voltage = 10 x (sqrt(2)) = 14.14 volts RMS Voltage = 10 / (sqrt(2)) = 7.07 volts

Importance of Calculation in AC Circuit Analysis: Calculating the frequency and voltage of an AC waveform is important for designing and analyzing AC circuits. The frequency determines the inductive and capacitive reactance of a circuit, which affects the overall impedance and power factor. The voltage affects the voltage and current levels in a circuit, which in turn affect the power output and efficiency of the circuit.

Conclusion: Calculating the frequency and voltage of an AC waveform is essential for designing and analyzing AC circuits. The frequency determines the inductive and capacitive reactance of a circuit, while the voltage affects the voltage and current levels in a circuit. Understanding these calculations is crucial for any electrical engineer or technician working with AC circuits.

Join the conversation