Course Content
Alternating Current (AC)
Advantages of (AC) - AC Waveforms - Sine Wave Values - Resistive Loads - Power in an AC Circuit - Skin Affects in AC circuits
0/5
Basic Trigonometry and Vectors
- Right Triangles - The Pythagorean Theorem - Sines - Cosigns - Tangents - Formulas - Practical Application
Inductance in AC Circuits
Inductance - Inductive Reactance - Schematic Symbols - Inductors Connected In Series - Inductors Connected In Parallel Circuits - Voltage & Current Relationships in an Inductive Circuit - Power in an Inductive Circuit - Reactive power - Q of an Inductor
Resistive-Inductive Series Circuits
R-L Series Circuits - Impedance - Total Current - Total Current - Voltage Drop across the Resistor - Watts - Computing the Inductance - Total Voltage - Computing the Reactive Power- Computing the Apparent Power - Power Factor - Angle Theta
Resistive-Inductive Parallel Circuits
Resistive-Inductance Parallel Circuits - Computing Circuit Values
Electrical Theory – Alternating Current (AC), Basic Trigonometry and Resistance
About Lesson

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the characteristics of an AC waveform
  • Define frequency, amplitude, and phase in AC circuits
  • Understand the importance of these characteristics in designing and analyzing AC circuits

Introduction: Alternating Current (AC) is a type of electrical current that reverses direction at regular intervals. AC is characterized by a waveform that has several important properties, including frequency, amplitude, and phase. These characteristics are essential for designing and analyzing AC circuits, and understanding them is crucial for any electrical engineer or technician working with AC circuits.

Characteristics of AC Waveform:

  1. Frequency: The frequency of an AC waveform is the number of complete cycles that the waveform completes in one second. The standard frequency for AC power in the United States is 60 Hz, meaning that the waveform completes 60 cycles in one second. Frequency is measured in Hertz (Hz).

  2. Amplitude: The amplitude of an AC waveform is the maximum value of the waveform from the center or zero point. Amplitude is measured in volts (V) or amperes (A) depending on the application.

  3. Phase: The phase of an AC waveform is the relationship between the waveform and a reference waveform. This reference waveform is usually a sine wave that is used as a standard reference. The phase is measured in degrees (°) or radians (rad). When two waveforms are said to be in phase, it means they reach their maximum and minimum points at the same time. When they are out of phase, it means their maximum and minimum points do not coincide.

Importance of Characteristics in AC Circuits: Understanding the characteristics of AC waveforms is essential for designing and analyzing AC circuits. For example, the frequency of an AC waveform determines the inductive and capacitive reactance of a circuit, which in turn affects the overall impedance and power factor. The amplitude of an AC waveform affects the voltage and current levels in a circuit, and the phase of an AC waveform determines the phase relationship between voltage and current in a circuit.

Conclusion: AC waveforms have several important characteristics, including frequency, amplitude, and phase. These characteristics are essential for designing and analyzing AC circuits, and understanding them is crucial for any electrical engineer or technician working with AC circuits. The frequency, amplitude, and phase of an AC waveform all affect the behavior of an AC circuit and can be used to control and manipulate the flow of electrical power.

Join the conversation