Course Content
Rules for the Intense National Football League
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INFL Rules
About Lesson

  1. The Game:
  • The game will consist of two quarters, each lasting 30 minutes.
  • The first possession of each half, starts at the 25 yard line
  • A team consist of a men’s team, a women’s team & a MMA team
  • The team with the most points at the end of the game will be declared the winner.
  • Overtime will consist of one possession per team, starting from the opponent’s 25-yard line. If the game is still tied after the first possession, the game will continue in a sudden death format until a winner is determined.
  • Each team will be allowed three timeouts per half.

Field and Equipment:

  • The field will be 100 yards long and 53.3 yards wide.
  • The football used will be a standard college football.
  • All players must wear helmets, shoulder pads, thigh pads, and knee pads. Mouthguards are strongly recommended.
  1. Scoring:
  • Touchdowns will be worth six points.
  • Extra points will be attempted from the 2-yard line and will be worth one point. Alternatively, teams can choose to attempt a 2-point conversion from the 3-yard line.
  • Field goals will be worth three points and can be attempted from anywhere on the field.
  1. Timing:
  • The clock will stop after every first down and restart once the ball is set.
  • The clock will stop for out-of-bounds plays, incomplete passes, penalties, and timeouts.
  • The clock will start on the snap after a change of possession, including after punts and turnovers.
  1. Penalties:
  • Penalties will be assessed according to standard college football rules.
  • Unsportsmanlike conduct penalties will be strictly enforced, and players may be ejected for repeated violations.
  • Penalties will be assessed for any violation of the rules of the game.
  • Penalties can result in the loss of yards, automatic first downs, or disqualification from the game.
  • The penalty yardage will be marked off from the spot of the foul.
  • If the penalty yardage results in the offense being behind their own goal line, the ball will be spotted on the 1-yard line.
  • Penalties will be assessed for any violation of the rules of the game.
  • Penalties can result in the loss of yards, automatic first downs, or disqualification from the game.
  • The penalty yardage will be marked off from the spot of the foul.
  • If the penalty yardage results in the offense being behind their own goal line, the ball will be spotted on the 1-yard line.

Enforcement of Penalties:

Penalties can be enforced from the spot of the foul or from the previous spot, depending on the type of penalty.

If a penalty occurs during a play that results in a touchdown, the penalty will be assessed on the ensuing kickoff.

If multiple penalties occur on the same play, the penalties will be enforced in the order they occurred.

If a penalty occurs before the snap, the down will be replayed with the appropriate penalty assessed.

These are the general penalty rules based on college football. The severity and enforcement of the penalties may vary depending on the specific conference or level of play.

  1. Overtime:
  • Overtime will consist of one possession per team, starting from the opponent’s 25-yard line.
  • Each team will have four downs to score a touchdown or field goal.
  • If the game is still tied after the first possession, the game will continue in a sudden death format until a winner is determined.

  1. Quarterback Position:
  • The quarterback is the offensive player who receives the snap from the center and initiates the play.
  • The quarterback may pass, hand off, or run the ball.
  • The quarterback is responsible for calling the play in the huddle and making adjustments at the line of scrimmage based on the defense’s alignment.
  • Quarterback Responsibilities:
  • The quarterback must stay behind the line of scrimmage before throwing the ball. If the quarterback crosses the line of scrimmage before throwing, it is an illegal forward pass and the play will be whistled dead.
  • The quarterback must make sure that all eligible receivers are set before the snap. If not, it will result in an illegal formation penalty.
  • The quarterback is responsible for reading the defense and making appropriate adjustments to the play call based on the defensive alignment.
  • The quarterback must protect the ball when running or passing to avoid turnovers.
  • The quarterback must have good field vision and decision-making skills to execute the offense effectively.
  • Quarterback Protection:
  • The quarterback is considered a “protected player” and may not be hit in the head or neck area.
  • Defensive players may not hit the quarterback after he has thrown the ball or is in a “defenseless posture,” such as when he is in the act of sliding.
  • Roughing the passer penalties will be assessed if a defender makes unnecessary contact with the quarterback after the ball has been thrown.
  • Quarterback Substitutions:
  • A team may substitute quarterbacks at any time during the game, but the new quarterback must report to the official before entering the game.
  • If a quarterback is injured and unable to continue, the team may substitute another player at the quarterback position.

  1. Offensive Linemen Position:
  • Offensive linemen are the players on the offense who line up on the line of scrimmage and block for the quarterback and ball carriers.
  • The offensive line consists of five players, typically a center, two guards, and two tackles.
  • Offensive Linemen Responsibilities:
  • Offensive linemen must stay on the line of scrimmage before the snap.
  • Offensive linemen must block the defenders in front of them to protect the quarterback and create running lanes for the ball carrier.
  • Offensive linemen may not move forward until the ball is snapped.
  • Offensive linemen may not use their hands to hold or grab the defenders in front of them. If they do, it will result in a holding penalty.
  • Offensive linemen may not move laterally or backward at the snap in an attempt to draw defenders offside.
  • Offensive Linemen Protection:
  • Offensive linemen are considered protected players and may not be hit in the head or neck area.
  • Defensive players may not initiate contact with an offensive lineman’s head or neck area, nor may they use their hands to grab or twist an offensive lineman’s facemask.
  • Offensive linemen are not allowed to chop block, which is a low block to the legs of a defender.
  • Offensive Linemen Substitutions:
  • A team may substitute offensive linemen at any time during the game, but the new lineman must report to the official before entering the game.
  • Offensive linemen may not change their position on the field to catch a pass unless they report to the official and are declared eligible to catch a pass.

  1. Running Back Position:
  • Running backs are the offensive players who line up behind the quarterback and are primarily responsible for carrying the ball.
  • Running backs may also be used as receivers in the passing game or as blockers in pass protection.
  • Running Back Responsibilities:
  • Running backs must stay behind the line of scrimmage before the ball is snapped.
  • Running backs must carry the ball securely and protect it from defenders trying to strip it.
  • Running backs must follow the blocking scheme of the offensive line to find running lanes and gain yards.
  • Running backs may be asked to pass block and protect the quarterback from incoming defenders in passing situations.
  • Running backs may be used as receivers in the passing game and must run precise routes to get open and catch the ball.
  • Running Back Protection:
  • Running backs are considered “protected players” and may not be hit in the head or neck area.
  • Defensive players may not use their hands to grab or twist a running back’s facemask.
  • Running backs may not lower their head and initiate contact with the crown of their helmet.
  • Running Back Substitutions:
  • A team may substitute running backs at any time during the game.
  • Running backs may not change their position on the field to catch a pass unless they report to the official and are declared eligible to catch a pass.

  1. Wide Receiver Position:
  • Wide receivers are offensive players who line up on the line of scrimmage or in the backfield and are primarily responsible for catching passes.
  • Wide receivers may also be used in running plays as blockers or ball carriers.
  • Wide Receiver Responsibilities:
  • Wide receivers must line up on the line of scrimmage and may not cross the line of scrimmage before the ball is snapped.
  • Wide receivers must run precise routes and use their speed and agility to get open and catch the ball.
  • Wide receivers may also be asked to block for ball carriers or other receivers in running plays.
  • Wide receivers may not initiate contact with a defender beyond five yards from the line of scrimmage, except within the area of the field known as the “blocking zone.”
  • Wide Receiver Protection:
  • Wide receivers are considered “protected players” and may not be hit in the head or neck area.
  • Defensive players may not use their hands to grab or twist a wide receiver’s facemask.
  • Wide Receiver Substitutions:
  • A team may substitute wide receivers at any time during the game.
  • Wide receivers may not change their position on the field to block or catch a pass unless they report to the official and are declared eligible to catch a pass.

  1. Defensive Lineman Position:
  • Defensive linemen are the players on the defensive team who line up in the front line of the defense, typically closest to the line of scrimmage.
  • Defensive linemen are responsible for stopping the offense from advancing the ball by tackling ball carriers, pressuring the quarterback, and disrupting the offense’s blocking schemes.
  • Defensive Lineman Responsibilities:
  • Defensive linemen must stay on their side of the line of scrimmage until the ball is snapped.
  • Defensive linemen may not use their hands to grab or hold offensive players, except to shed blockers in the process of tackling a ball carrier or sacking the quarterback.
  • Defensive linemen must use proper technique and leverage to gain an advantage over offensive linemen and penetrate the line of scrimmage to disrupt plays.
  • Defensive linemen may also be used in pass coverage or as spies to shadow the quarterback in certain defensive schemes.
  • Defensive Lineman Protection:
  • Defensive linemen may not initiate contact with an offensive player’s helmet, face mask, or neck.
  • Offensive linemen may not cut block defensive linemen below the waist unless the defensive player is already engaged with another offensive player.
  • Defensive Lineman Substitutions:
  • A team may substitute defensive linemen at any time during the game.
  • Defensive linemen may not change their position on the field unless they report to the official and are declared eligible to participate in pass coverage or other defensive schemes.

  1. Linebacker Position:
  • Linebackers are defensive players who typically line up behind the defensive line and in front of the secondary, although they may also line up on the line of scrimmage in certain defensive schemes.
  • Linebackers are responsible for stopping the run, covering receivers in pass coverage, and pressuring the quarterback.
  • Linebacker Responsibilities:
  • Linebackers must stay on their side of the line of scrimmage until the ball is snapped, unless they are blitzing.
  • Linebackers may use their hands to initiate contact with offensive players, but may not hold or grab the face mask or neck of an opposing player.
  • Linebackers must have the ability to read and react to offensive plays, and must be able to tackle effectively in the open field.
  • Linebackers may be used in pass coverage, man-to-man coverage on receivers, or in zone coverage, depending on the defensive scheme.
  • Linebacker Protection:
  • Linebackers are considered “protected players” and may not be hit in the head or neck area.
  • Offensive players may not use their hands to grab or twist a linebacker’s facemask.
  • Linebacker Substitutions:
  • A team may substitute linebackers at any time during the game.
  • Linebackers may not change their position on the field unless they report to the official and are declared eligible to participate in pass coverage or other defensive schemes.

  1. Cornerback and Safety Positions:
  • Cornerbacks and safeties are defensive players who line up in the secondary, behind the defensive line and linebackers.
  • Cornerbacks are typically responsible for covering wide receivers, while safeties are responsible for providing support in pass coverage and stopping the run.
  • Cornerback and Safety Responsibilities:
  • Cornerbacks and safeties must stay on their side of the field until the ball is snapped, unless they are blitzing.
  • Cornerbacks and safeties may use their hands to initiate contact with offensive players, but may not hold or grab the face mask or neck of an opposing player.
  • Cornerbacks must have the ability to cover receivers in man-to-man coverage or zone coverage, and must be able to make open-field tackles.
  • Safeties must be able to read and react to offensive plays, provide support in pass coverage, and be able to make tackles in the open field.
  • Both cornerbacks and safeties may be used in blitz packages to pressure the quarterback.
  • Cornerback and Safety Protection:
  • Cornerbacks and safeties are considered “protected players” and may not be hit in the head or neck area.
  • Offensive players may not use their hands to grab or twist a cornerback or safety’s facemask.
  • Cornerback and Safety Substitutions:
  • A team may substitute cornerbacks and safeties at any time during the game.
  • Cornerbacks and safeties may not change their position on the field unless they report to the official and are declared eligible to participate in pass coverage or other defensive schemes.
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