Course Content
Article 200 – Use and Identifications of Grounded Conductors
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Article 210 Branch Circuits
Article 210 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers the requirements for branch circuits, which are the circuits that supply power to the outlets, lighting fixtures, and other loads in a building. In this lesson, we will discuss the key requirements of Article 210.
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Article 215 Feeders
Article 215 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers the requirements for feeders, which are the circuits that supply power from the service equipment to the branch circuits in a building. In this lesson, we will discuss the key requirements of Article 215.
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Article 230 Services
In summary, Article 230 provides specific requirements for the installation of service conductors and equipment to ensure safe and reliable delivery of electrical power to buildings and structures.
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Article 242: Overvoltage Protection
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NEC Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection
About Lesson

Equipment grounding is an essential part of electrical systems, providing a path for fault currents to flow safely to ground. Article 250 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) outlines the requirements for equipment grounding, including the types of equipment grounding conductors, connections, and methods of grounding.

Types of Equipment Grounding Conductors:

  1. Green or bare copper conductors: These are the most commonly used equipment grounding conductors. They must be continuous, and their size must be based on the circuit’s ampere rating.

  2. Flexible metal conduit (FMC): FMC may be used as an equipment grounding conductor if it meets certain requirements, such as being brass or copper-coated and continuous.

  3. Rigid metal conduit (RMC) and intermediate metal conduit (IMC): These types of conduits may be used as equipment grounding conductors if they meet certain requirements, such as being threaded, bolted, or otherwise securely fastened.

  4. Non-metallic conduit and tubing: Non-metallic conduit and tubing may be used as equipment grounding conductors if they are listed for the purpose and contain an equipment grounding conductor.

  5. Armored cable (AC) and metal-clad cable (MC): AC and MC may be used as equipment grounding conductors if the armor or metal-clad sheath is listed for grounding purposes and contains an equipment grounding conductor.

Connections:

Equipment grounding conductors must be connected to the grounding electrode system at the service location, to equipment grounding terminals or devices, or to both. The connections must be made by a listed connector, clamp, or fitting that is properly installed.

Methods of Grounding:

There are three methods of equipment grounding: (1) equipment grounding conductor, (2) grounding electrode conductor, and (3) grounded conductor.

  1. Equipment grounding conductor: This method involves using an equipment grounding conductor to provide a low-impedance path for fault currents to flow to ground.

  2. Grounding electrode conductor: This method involves using a grounding electrode conductor to connect the grounding electrode system to the service equipment.

  3. Grounded conductor: This method involves using a grounded conductor as the equipment grounding conductor, provided the grounded conductor is not smaller than specified in Table 250.122.

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