Course Content
Article 200 – Use and Identifications of Grounded Conductors
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Article 210 Branch Circuits
Article 210 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers the requirements for branch circuits, which are the circuits that supply power to the outlets, lighting fixtures, and other loads in a building. In this lesson, we will discuss the key requirements of Article 210.
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Article 215 Feeders
Article 215 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers the requirements for feeders, which are the circuits that supply power from the service equipment to the branch circuits in a building. In this lesson, we will discuss the key requirements of Article 215.
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Article 230 Services
In summary, Article 230 provides specific requirements for the installation of service conductors and equipment to ensure safe and reliable delivery of electrical power to buildings and structures.
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Article 242: Overvoltage Protection
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NEC Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection
About Lesson

Grounding conductors are a crucial component of electrical systems, providing a path for fault current to flow back to the source and trip the circuit breaker. This lesson will cover the requirements for grounding conductors as outlined in Article 250 of the NEC.

Overview:

Grounding conductors are the conductors that connect the grounding electrode system to the equipment grounding conductor. The grounding conductor should be sized based on the size of the circuit conductors and the rating of the overcurrent protective device.

Requirements:

  1. Size Requirements: The grounding conductor should be sized according to NEC Table 250.122, based on the rating of the overcurrent protective device (OCPD) and the size of the circuit conductors. The minimum size of the grounding conductor shall not be smaller than specified in Table 250.122, but it can be larger than the specified minimum if needed to meet the requirements of other sections of the NEC.

  2. Material Requirements: The grounding conductor must be made of copper, aluminum, or copper-clad aluminum. Copper-clad steel may also be used if the cladding is at least 10% of the cross-sectional area of the conductor.

  3. Attachment and Termination: The grounding conductor must be mechanically and electrically attached to the grounding electrode and to the equipment grounding conductor at each end. The connection to the grounding electrode should be made by a listed grounding clamp or other listed means. The connection to the equipment grounding conductor should be made by a listed terminal or other listed means.

  4. Routing: The grounding conductor should be routed in a manner that avoids physical damage and interference with other systems or conductors. The grounding conductor should be installed in a straight line as much as possible, without unnecessary bends or loops.

  5. Identification: The grounding conductor should be identified by green insulation or a green marking. If the conductor is bare, it should be identified by a green marking.

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