Course Content
Article 200 – Use and Identifications of Grounded Conductors
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Article 210 Branch Circuits
Article 210 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers the requirements for branch circuits, which are the circuits that supply power to the outlets, lighting fixtures, and other loads in a building. In this lesson, we will discuss the key requirements of Article 210.
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Article 215 Feeders
Article 215 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers the requirements for feeders, which are the circuits that supply power from the service equipment to the branch circuits in a building. In this lesson, we will discuss the key requirements of Article 215.
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Article 230 Services
In summary, Article 230 provides specific requirements for the installation of service conductors and equipment to ensure safe and reliable delivery of electrical power to buildings and structures.
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Article 242: Overvoltage Protection
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NEC Chapter 2 Wiring and Protection
About Lesson

System grounding is a critical aspect of electrical system design and installation. The National Electrical Code (NEC) provides requirements for system grounding to ensure safety and protection against electrical hazards. This lesson will cover the basics of system grounding and the NEC requirements.

System Grounding: System grounding refers to the connection of one of the circuit conductors (usually the neutral) to the earth or to a conductive body that is connected to the earth. The purpose of system grounding is to provide a low-impedance path for fault currents to flow to the earth, thereby tripping overcurrent protection devices and isolating the fault.

General Requirements: Article 250 of the NEC contains the general requirements for grounding and bonding. Some of the key provisions of the article are:

  • The grounding electrode system must be designed and installed to ensure that a reliable path to the earth is provided.
  • The grounding electrode conductor must be securely fastened to the grounding electrode and the equipment grounding conductor must be bonded to the grounding electrode system.
  • A bonding jumper must be installed around any non-current carrying metal parts that may become energized, such as enclosures or raceways.
  • Equipment grounding conductors must be installed to ensure that all exposed non-current carrying metal parts that may become energized are bonded together and connected to the grounding electrode system.
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